Noted

Sussing out the Soul of Rock and Roll in Los Angeles
In other news, here’s an interview I did with Paul Oakenfold about why Burning Man is incredible.
Interview sneak preview:Me: So Paul, why is Burning Man special to you? Paul Oakenfold: Have you been? Me: I have, yeah. Paul Oakenfold: So you know why.
In other other news, I’m going (back) to Burning Man now. Bye. 

In other news, here’s an interview I did with Paul Oakenfold about why Burning Man is incredible.

Interview sneak preview:
Me: So Paul, why is Burning Man special to you? 
Paul Oakenfold: Have you been? 
Me: I have, yeah. 
Paul Oakenfold: So you know why.

In other other news, I’m going (back) to Burning Man now. Bye. 

I USED TO GO TO CHURCH

Once a week, sometimes twice, for the first fifteen years of my life and on intermittent holidays thereafter, but it never made me feel anything. Then I started going to concerts, and that’s where I started feeling all of the things that I think church was intended to make me feel: thrilled, epic, powerful, connected, emotional, alive, in love. Live music too gave me permission to feel all the stuff church didn’t allow: anger, lust, sadness, so on.

It was at various concerts in Northeast Wisconsin and sometimes Milwaukee where I first began having direct experiences with god, or whatever you want to call it, the universe, energy, the thing you feel when you’re just really feeling it, when it’s there, undeniably. I felt it in arenas and amphitheaters and parks and parking lots, and from then on all I really wanted was to feel was that feeling. Music was my access point. And just to be clear, this was before I started doing drugs. 

What I’m getting at here is that last night I saw Darkside play for what might have been the last time. Or at least the last time for me, because they have a few more dates in Europe and will then play their final show in Brooklyn on September 13. I was there on the floor of the LA Sports Arena with everyone who I wanted to be there with. I was a touch drunk and pretty sweaty. I had just eaten a large and wildly delicious piece of pizza and danced to a Daniel Avery set. I was not on drugs.

I don’t have the proper words to say what Darkside does to me, (like most of the best things in life, you just have to feel it) except to say that it was the fifth time I’ve seen the band this year and that I would have seen them infinity more times if that had been a possibility. I wore my Darkside t-shirt to the show, which is a terrifically dorky thing to do, but I did not give a shit. I did, however, get many t-shirt related high fives while walking through the crowd at FYF. “Darkside, she knows what’s up,” said a pretty women near the lemonade stand who pointed at me as I walked by. Tribal.

The point here is that like a lot of bands before them but no band ever quite like them, Darkside’s music makes me feel what Catholicism intended to but never did. It’s deep and it’s spiritual and it’s smart and it’s alluring and it’s sexy and if you’re a part of it then you kind of know what other people who are a part of it are all about. They make music that sort of carries you, (just like Jesus in that prayer about the footprints, actually.) There were moments last night, the moment where the guitar comes in on Metatron, for example, where I couldn’t help but scream. There were moments where I just closed my eyes and stood as still as possible and felt it in my mind and my heart and my body. 

At the end of the show Dave Harrington took his guitar and smashed it through the spinning mirror that they use for their light show in a move that seemed to exclaim “Goodnight Los Angeles, Darkside is fucking over!” I stood there with my hand over my mouth. Andrea cried. We didn’t leave, we just sat on the dirty floor and processed what we had just seen in words that did it no justice. I said something like, “I felt like I was bathing in the music,” which sounds asinine out of context but makes sense if you were also there last night, bathing in the music.

We eventually left the arena and watched Flying Lotus for awhile and then I took a cab home and ate a bagel and laid in bed listening to Psychic, feeling heartsick for reasons including but not limited to what I had just experienced. 

So yeah, I’m sad that it’s over, but I feel like they’ll be back. Either way, they were a fucking important band for a brief period of time and I got to be a part of it with some of the people I love best, and for that I am grateful. I sound like a disciple. I suppose I am. Last night I went to church. It made me feel everything.

See y’all today at the Todd Terje set. Fuck yeah. 

See y’all today at the Todd Terje set. Fuck yeah. 

Happy Friday. 

THE LAST TEN SONGS MY IPOD SHUFFLE JUST PLAYED

Truly an unprecedented run of hits.

1. Sad Sad City - Ghostland Observatory 

2. Shelter From the Storm - Bob Dylan 

3. Fell In Love With a Girl (Live at Bonnaroo) - The White Stripes

4. Mahgeetah - My Morning Jacket

5. Bowl of Oranges - Bright Eyes

6. So Much for the Afterglow - Everclear 

7. Jackie Wants a Black Eye - Dr. Dog

8. November Rain (Live) - Guns ‘N Roses

9. Mr. November - The National

10. Hey Hey What Can I Do - Led Motherfucking Zeppelin

track(s) of the day:

This pair of tracks are B-sides from my favorite album of 2013, Psychic, which was the debut LP from one of my favorite all time bands ever, Darkside. (Dig deep enough into this blog and you’ll find approximately 56 posts about them.) I saw Darkside four times this year, and I’m totally fucking serious when I say that those four shows were four of the best I’ve ever seen. Especially the one with Ali at the Observatory in Santa Ana and especially especially the one the first weekend of Coachella on the night of the windstorm. That was a magical evening for many reasons including but not limited to the fact that I was with a really spectacular collection of people and that the windstorm made everything feel sort of epic.

So it’s really bittersweet that Darkside released these two (fucking excellent, obviously) songs three days ago and then this morning came out with the news that they’re disbanding, “for now.” I suppose it wasn’t built to last. Nicolas Jaar and Dave Harrington both seem like young, highly creative people with many divergent interests and long and varied careers ahead of them. I’m eager to see what they do next. I would pay to watch them bag groceries.

The silver lining here is that Darkside is playing FYF next weekend, and that I’m going to be there with Ali and several of those aforementioned spectacular people. Maybe it will be the last time I ever see them and maybe it will not be. What’s certain is that a week from today I’ll be somewhere towards the front of the crowd at the L.A. Sports Arena dancing and most likely trying not to cry. 

current mood. 

lazaretto: [laz-uh-ret-oh]
1. a hospital for those affected with contagious diseases,especially leprosy.2. a building or a ship set apart for quarantine purposes3. an album by one of the most, if not the most, important rockstars of our time, out today

lazaretto: [laz-uh-ret-oh]

1. a hospital for those affected with contagious diseases,especially leprosy.
2. a building or a ship set apart for quarantine purposes
3. an album by one of the most, if not the most, important rockstars of our time, out today

TODAY IS THE 30 YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF BORN IN THE USA

As such, I will now recap a Born In the USA-related story I once heard on a rerun of Biography:

Once upon a time in New Jersey, a friend of Bruce’s was sitting at a bar, drinking and feeling mighty sad. Bruce walks into the bar, asks the friend what’s wrong, and the friend tells Bruce that his father has recently died. Bruce asks his friend to give him the red baseball cap that the friend is wearing. The friend is confused, but he does it. Bruce says “every time you see this hat, I want you to think of your father.”

A few weeks later, Born in the USA is released. The friend picks up the album and sees his red hat sticking out of Bruce’s back pocket on the cover.

Amen.